• From Spring through Summer, there are always flowers to photograph.  Often they are wild but some are domestic, planted in gardens.

    Wildflower Workshop_May072016_0070

    Here are nine tips for getting better flower pictures:

    1. Fill the camera screen with as much flower as possible to see the detail.
    2. Photograph the flower in the shade, whether shaded naturally or by you shading it with your body or diffuser.
    3. If your camera has a permanent attached lens, use the macro shooting mode to allow you to focus closer to the flower.
    4. If you are using a DSLR camera there are several ways to focus closer; you can use a close-up filter on the front of you standard lens, you can use extension tubes between your camera body and standard lens, get close with a wide-angle lens, or you can use a dedicated macro lens.
    5. A tripod can help steady your camera and help you think about the composition.
    6. I have also laid on the ground handholding my camera to get a better angle.
    7. Notice how much the slightest breeze moves the flower and make sure your shutter speed can stop any motion. You may need to use continuous shooting mode if the bloom keeps moving and hope to get one in focus.
    8. Depth-of-field can be critical, so be sure you have enough to get the percentage of the flower you want in sharp focus.
    9. Beware that your background is not too distracting.

    Wildflower Workshop_May072016_0091  Blue Phlox_050716_0059  061816_0025_1_cr  Kingwood Center 042112_0072  Magnolia Bloom_04072010_02  Flower_040210_0182_1  Daffodil_042311_0060

     

    I know there are many tips here, but I hope there are a few that will help you create better flower pictures this spring.  Now let us all get out and create some masterpieces! Any comments or questions can be posted in the Comment section below.